What is Chi-squared test for variances?

Chi-squared test for variances. A chi-square test can be used to test if the variance of a population is equal to a specified value. This test can be either a two-sided test or a one-sided test. The two-sided version tests against the alternative that the true variance is either less than or greater than the specified value. The one-sided version only tests in one direction. The choice of a two-sided or one-sided test is determined by the problem. For example, if we are testing a new process, we may only be concerned if its variability is greater than the variability of the current process.

What is Chi-squared test for goodness of fit?

Chi-squared test for goodness of fit also written as a χ2 test is any statistical hypothesis test wherein the sampling distribution of the test statistic is a chi-squared distribution when the null hypothesis is true. Without other qualification, ‘chi-squared test’ often is used as short for Pearson’s chi-squared test. Chi-squared tests are often constructed from a sum of squared errors, or through the sample variance. Test statistics that follow a chi-squared distribution arise from an assumption of independent normally distributed data, which is valid in many cases due to the central limit theorem. A chi-squared test can be used to attempt rejection of the null hypothesis that the data are independent. Also considered a chi-squared test is a test in which this is asymptotically true, meaning that the sampling distribution (if the null hypothesis is true) can be made to approximate a chi-squared distribution as closely as desired by making the sample size large enough. The chi-squared test is used to determine whether there is a significant difference between the expected frequencies and the observed frequencies in one or more categories.

What is Central Limit Theorem?

Central Limit Theorem (CLT) is a statistical theory that states that given a sufficiently large sample size from a population with a finite level of variance, the mean of all samples from the same population will be approximately equal to the mean of the population. Furthermore, all of the samples will follow an approximately normal distribution pattern, with all variances being approximately equal to the variance of the population divided by each sample’s size. According to the central limit theorem, the mean of a sample of data will be closer to the mean of the overall population in question as the sample size increases, notwithstanding the actual distribution of the data, and whether it is normal or non-normal. As a general rule, sample sizes equal to or greater than 30 are considered sufficient for the central limit theorem to hold, meaning the distribution of the sample means is fairly normally distributed. The central limit theorem is the basis for sampling in statistics, so it holds the foundation for sampling and statistical analysis in finance as well. Investors of all types rely on the central limit theorem to analyze stock returns, construct portfolios and manage risk.

What is Causation?

Causation. Two or more variables considered to be related, in a statistical context, if their values change so that as the value of one variable increases or decreases so does the value of the other variable (although it may be in the opposite direction). Theoretically, the difference between the two types of relationships is easy to identify — an action or occurrence can cause another (e.g. smoking causes an increase in the risk of developing lung cancer), or it can correlate with another (e.g. smoking is correlated with alcoholism, but it does not cause alcoholism). In practice, however, it remains difficult to clearly establish cause and effect, compared with establishing correlation. The use of a controlled study is the most effective way of establishing causality between variables. In a controlled study, the sample or population is split in two, with both groups being comparable in almost every way. The two groups then receive different treatments, and the outcomes of each group are assessed. Due to ethical reasons, there are limits to the use of controlled studies. To overcome this situation, observational studies are often used to investigate correlation and causation for the population of interest.

What is Categorical Variable?

Categorical Variable in statistics is a variable that can take on one of a limited, and usually fixed number of possible values, assigning each unit of observation to a particular group or nominal category on the basis of some qualitative property. In computer science and some branches of mathematics, categorical variables are referred to as enumerations or enumerated types. Commonly, each of the possible values of a categorical variable is referred to as a level. The probability distribution associated with a random categorical variable is called a categorical distribution. Categorical data is the statistical data type consisting of categorical variables or of data that has been converted into that form, for example as grouped data. A categorical variable that can take on exactly two values is termed a binary variable or dichotomous variable an important special case is the Bernoulli variable. Categorical variables with more than two possible values are called polytomous variables, categorical variables are often assumed to be polytomous unless otherwise specified.

What is CART or Classification And Regression Trees?

CART or Classification And Regression Trees are machine-learning methods for constructing prediction models from data. The models are obtained by recursively partitioning the data space and fitting a simple prediction model within each partition. As a result, the partitioning can be represented graphically as a decision tree. Classification trees are designed for dependent variables that take a finite number of unordered values, with prediction error measured in terms of misclassification cost. Regression trees are for dependent variables that take continuous or ordered discrete values, with prediction error typically measured by the squared difference between the observed and predicted values.

What is Box plot?

Box plots is a quick way of examining one or more sets of data graphically. In statistics, a box plot is a convenient way of depicting groups of numerical data through their quartiles. Box plots may also have lines extending vertically from the boxes (whiskers) indicating variability outside the upper and lower quartiles, which brings up the terms box-and-whisker plot and box-and-whisker diagram. Outliers may be plotted as individual points.
Box plots are non-parametric: they display variation in samples of a statistical population without making any assumptions about the underlying statistical distribution. The spacings between the different parts of the box indicate the degree of dispersion (spread) and skewness in the data and show outliers. In addition to the points themselves, they allow one to visually estimate various L-estimators, notably the interquartile range, midhinge, range, and mid-range. Box plots can be drawn either horizontally or vertically. Box plots received their name from the box in the middle. But the ends of the whiskers can represent several possible alternative values, among them: the minimum and maximum of all the data, one standard deviation above and below the mean of the data, the 1st percentile and 99th percentile, the 2nd percentile and the 98th percentile, etc.

What is Bootstrapping?

Bootstrapping. In statistics, bootstrapping is any test or metric that relies on random sampling with replacement. Bootstrapping allows assigning measures of accuracy (defined in terms of bias, variance, confidence intervals, prediction error or some other such measure) to sample estimates. This technique allows estimation of the sampling distribution of almost any statistic using random sampling methods. Generally, it falls in the broader class of resampling methods. Bootstrapping is the practice of estimating properties of an estimator (such as its variance) by measuring those properties when sampling from an approximating distribution. One standard choice for an approximating distribution is the empirical distribution function of the observed data. In the case where a set of observations can be assumed to be from an independent and identically distributed population, this can be implemented by constructing a number of resamples with replacement, of the observed dataset (and of equal size to the observed dataset). It may also be used for constructing hypothesis tests. It is often used as an alternative to statistical inference based on the assumption of a parametric model when that assumption is in doubt, or where parametric inference is impossible or requires complicated formulas for the calculation of standard errors.

What is Boltzmann Machine?

Boltzmann machine is a network of symmetrically connected, neuronlike units that make stochastic decisions about whether to be on or off. Boltzmann machines have a simple learning algorithm that allows them to discover interesting features in datasets composed of binary vectors. The learning algorithm is very slow in networks with many layers of feature detectors, but it can be made much faster by learning one layer of feature detectors at a time. Boltzmann machines are used to solve two quite different computational problems. For a search problem, the weights on the connections are fixed and are used to represent the cost function of an optimization problem. The stochastic dynamics of a Boltzmann machine then allow it to sample binary state vectors that represent good solutions to the optimization problem. For a learning problem, the Boltzmann machine is shown a set of binary data vectors and it must find weights on the connections so that the data vectors are good solutions to the optimization problem defined by those weights. To solve a learning problem, Boltzmann machines make many small updates to their weights, and each update requires them to solve many different search problems.

What is Big Data?

Big data is a term for data sets that are so large or complex that traditional data processing application software is inadequate to deal with them. Challenges include capture, storage, analysis, data curation, search, sharing, transfer, visualization, querying, updating and information privacy. The term “big data” often refers simply to the use of predictive analytics, user behavior analytics, or certain other advanced data analytics methods that extract value from data, and seldom to a particular size of data set. Scientists, business executives, practitioners of medicine, advertising and governments alike regularly meet difficulties with large data-sets in areas including Internet search, finance, urban informatics, and business informatics. Scientists encounter limitations in e-Science work, including meteorology, complex physics simulations, biology and environmental research. Data sets grow rapidly – in part because they are increasingly gathered by cheap and numerous information-sensing mobile devices, aerial, software logs, cameras, microphones, radio-frequency identification readers and wireless sensor networks. Relational database management systems, desktop statistics, and visualization-packages often have difficulty handling big data. What counts as “big data” varies depending on the capabilities of the users and their tools, and expanding capabilities make big data a moving target.